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Library Construction Update

The library is constantly working to improve the user experience for patrons. We’ve learned that many students prefer to study where there is natural light. After looking at all the options, from moving stacks to digging window wells for the lower levels (that’s not going to happen), we found the most effective change we could make was relocating library offices and work rooms away from the windows on level 3. This process took several years. First we relocated our circulation services into the center of level 3.  We also consolidated our Library Information Technology (L.I.T.) team into one space on level 2. We then unified and relocated our conservation lab and book repair studio and moved them into the space formerly used by L.I.T.

Right now the plastic lining the hall on level 3 is protecting everyone from the construction going on as we prepare to open a large study area filled with natural light next fall.

The construction teams do their best to work on noisy jobs early in the morning or other times when there are fewer people in the building.

If you are interested other library changes you can visit the south end of level 2 of the library, near the Science/Technology area, where new lighting and glass panel group study rooms have been installed.

 

 

 

 

Finish Strong: Keep Wearing Those Masks

The University recently posted good news about a new vaccination site.

They also reiterated the need to continue wearing masks.

 

If you are studying in the library we want you, and our staff, to be safe.

Please help out by wearing your mask.

We installed a few reminder signs on level 5 today.

We hope you notice them.

 

 

Celebrating Douglass Day 2021

The BYU Library is joining the national celebration of Douglass Day.

Zoom: 947 9162 9699

Passcode: 425283

“About the history of Douglass Day

Douglass Day was one of the original inspirations for Black History Month, and was revived starting in 2017 by the Colored Conventions Project. Learn a bit about the history of Douglass Days, past and present (plus a new mini-documentary).

Douglass Day is made possible by a large number of partners, models, and supporters. Past and present supporters include:

The Center for Black Digital Research at Penn State, the Colored Conventions Project, the Anna Julia Cooper Digital Project, the Moorland-Spingarn Research Center at Howard University, the Princeton University Center for Digital Humanities, the PSU Libraries, the PSU Center for Humanities and Information, and the PSU College of Liberal Arts, the American Studies Association for a Community Partnership Grant, and Zooniverse.

The transcribe-a-thon this year is powered by By the People from the Library of Congress.” douglassday.org

Plan to attend on February 12 from 10 am  to noon.

You can help out by transcribing historic documents.

 

Improving Special Collections

 

The L. Tom Perry Special Collections is pleased to announce that it has implemented Aeon. Aeon is an automated request and workflow management software specifically designed to improve patron service and to maximize staff efficiency.

The Aeon system will handle request management for the department and all patrons of Special Collections will need to create a user account at https://byu.aeon.atlas-sys.com/logon. This user account will allow you to submit requests to use materials in the Special Collections Reading Room and it will keep a history of the materials that you’ve requested for future reference.

The new request system will be available on Monday January 11th, 2021. You will be able to create a user account beginning on this date and will use the new system to request materials. All materials used in Special Collections will need to be requested through the new Aeon system. You will find links to Aeon in the library catalog (https://lib.byu.edu/) and through our finding aids website (http://archives.lib.byu.edu/).

We hope that the new systems we are implementing will enhance your Special Collections experience. Let us know if you have any questions at specialcollections@byu.edu or 801-422-3175.

The Reading Room is now Closed

Due to lack of compliance with the university’s mask policy the reading room/periodicals section of level 2 has been closed for the remainder of the year.

This change was implemented for the safety of library patrons and staff.

Plans are in place to close other areas of the building if it becomes necessary.

The Library encourages everyone to follow the campus-wide policy and wear a mask.

 

 

 

 

Building Update

Due to COVID-19 the library is limiting access to current BYU students and employees only.

The library is renovating sections of the library to improve usability for our patrons.

 

Level 5 (Humanities)

No construction at this time.

This floor is a temporary “Zoom Zone” for students who need a place to attend online classes, so it may be a little noisier than usual.

 

Level 4 (Music & Dance, Media Center, Juvenile Collection)

No construction at this time.

This floor is a temporary “Zoom Zone” for students who need a place to attend online classes, so it may be a little noisier than usual.

 

Level 3 (Circulation Desk, Snack Zone, The Hub)

This area will be very noisy for the next few days.

We are removing the north wall and installing new windows to provide more natural light in the building. This project was initiated in response to patron input.

If you need access to computer stations in a quieter setting we recommend you use the computers in the Periodicals/Reading Room on level 2.

 

Level 2 (Science/Technology, Family History, Periodicals/Reading Room)

We are in the process of improving sight-lines and traffic flow in the central and south parts of the building. The south end of the building will be noisy as we install the new ceiling.

The group study rooms are open during construction.

If you are looking for a quiet study area we recommend the Periodicals/Reading Room on level 2 or the Social Sciences area on level 1 of the library.

 

Level 1 (Social Sciences, Special Collections)

We are renovating a work room in the area between the atrium and the central part of the building. The concrete cutting is finished, but there may still be noise and or tripping hazards in the area as a new door is installed.

For quiet study we recommend the Social Sciences area on level 1.

 

 

 

 

Remembering Jennifer Paustenbaugh: 100 Great Books

 

On November 23, 2019, Jennifer Ford Paustenbaugh, BYU’s University Librarian, passed away following a long battle with breast cancer.

Paustenbaugh left a legacy of making library services and programs more student focused. Her work led to new ways for students to access scholarly resources and to student-focused changes to the library building. The Library has continued to build on her plans for improvements to ensure that students will benefit from her influence for years to come.

To mark the one year anniversary of her death, colleagues suggested that the Library look for something that symbolized her love of learning. One of her last goals was to read 100 great books. With that in mind library employees set out to collect 100 titles that they would recommend. Being library people, they quickly came up with well over 100, but the list has been narrowed down to fit the original goal. If you need more suggestions, you are always welcome to ask any library employee.

Most of these books are available from the library and others can be obtained through inter-library loan. Some are books we know she read, Anna Karenina, for example, and others are books our staff would have suggested to her.

Author Title BYU Library

Call #

Charles C. Mann 1491 : New revelations of the Americas before Columbus by E 61 .M266 2006
David McCullough 1776 E 208 .M396 2005
George Orwell 1984 PR 6029 .R8 N4944 1987
Mark Twain Adventures of Huckleberry Finn PS 1305 .A1
Irving Stone Agony and the Ecstasy, The PS 3537 .T669 A72 1961
Paulo Coelho Alchemist, The (Portuguese: O Alquimista) PQ9698.13.O3546 A813x
Lewis Carroll Alice in Wonderland 823 D66a 1990
Ronald C. White American Ulysses: A Life of Ulysses S. Grant E 672 .W48 2016
Leo Tolstoy Anna Karenina PG 3366 .A6 1939 vol.2
Parley P. Pratt Autobiography of Parley P. Pratt BX 8670.1 .P886 1985
Levi S. Peterson Backslider, The BX 8688.3 .P4425b 1986
Charles Dickens Bleak House PR 4556 .A1 1991
Markus Zusak Book Thief, The 823 Z89b
Trevor Noah Born a Crime: stories from a South African childhood PN 2287 .N557 A3 2016
C.S. Lewis Chronicles of Narnia 823 L585c 2004
Attributed to Confucius; translation by Edward G. Slingerland Confucius Analects: With Selections from Traditional Commentaries PL 2478 .L8 2003
Alexandre Dumas Count of Monte Cristo, The PQ 2226 .A31 1996
Fyodor Dostoyevsky Crime and Punishment PG 3326 .P7 1964
Willa Cather Death Comes for the Archbishop PS 3505 .A87 D4 1999
Dante Alighieri Divine Comedy, The (Inferno, Purgatory, and Paradise) PQ 4315 .W5
John Steinbeck East of Eden St34ea
Orson Scott Card Ender’s Game PZ 4 .C178 E52 1991
Ray Bradbury Fahrenheit 451 PS 3503 .R167 F318 2007
Buck Brannaman Faraway Horses, The
Thomas Hardy Far From the Madding Crowd PR 4745 .A1 1962
Mary Shelley Frankenstein PR 5397 .F7 1977
Jason Reynolds Ghost 813 R3345tr bk.1
Maureen Whipple Giant Joshua BX 8688.3 .W57g 1976
Marilynne Robinson Gilead PS 3568 .O3125 G55 2004
Pearl S. Buck Good Earth, The PS 3503 .U198 G6 2004
Alex Bellos Grapes of Math, The: How Life Reflects Numbers and Numbers Reflect Life
John Steinbeck Grapes of Wrath, The PS 3537 .T3234 G8 1986
C.S. Lewis Great Divorce, The BR 83 .L48 1996 vol.2
F. Scott Fitzgerald Great Gatsby, The PS 3511 .I9 G7 2002 pt.2
Louise Fitzhugh Harriet the Spy 813 F57h
J.K. Rowling Harry Potter 823 R797h
Catherine Ryan Hyde Have You Seen Luis Velez? Popular Reading

H 995 ha

Johanna Spyri Heidi 833 Sp99h 1996
Kathryn Stockett Help, The PS 3619 .T636 H45 2009
Peter Wohlleben Hidden Life of Trees, The: what they feel, how they communicate: discoveries from a secret world QK 475 .W6413x 2016
Corrie Ten Boom Hiding Place, The D 811.5 .T427x 1995
Richard Llewellyn How Green Was My Valley PR 6023 .L47 H6
Matt Parker Humble Pi: A comedy of maths errors QA 99 .P375x 2018
Maya Angelou I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings E 185.97 .A56 A3 1969
Rebecca Skloot Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks , The RC 265.6 .L23 S55
Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee Inherit the Wind, a play by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee PS 3523 .A934 I6 2003
Susanna Clark Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell C556jo
Bryan Stevenson Just Mercy: A story of justice and redemption KF 9223 .S74x 2014
Eleanor Herman and Peggielene Bartels King Peggy
Jorge Luis Borges Labyrinths PQ 7797 .B635 A29 1983
Walter Isaacson Leonardo da Vinci N 6923 .L33 I827 2017
Victor Hugo Les Miserables PQ 2286 .A38 1997
David Herbert Donald Lincoln L66Li
Antoine de Saint-Exupéry Little Prince, The (French: Le Petit Prince) PQ2637.A274 P413x
Louisa May Alcott Little Women PS 1017 .L5 1982
Larry McMurtry Lonesome Dove PS 3563 .A319 L6 1985
William Golding Lord of the Flies PR 6013 .O35 L6 2003
J.R.R. Tolkien Lord of the Rings trilogy PR 6039 .O32 L6
Arthur C. Brooks Love Your Enemies JK 1726 .B754 2019
Fredrik Backman Man Called Ove, A

(translated from Swedish)

PT 9877.12 .A32 M3613 2014
Viktor E. Frankl Man’s search for meaning D 805 .G3 F7233 2006
C.S. Lewis Mere Christianity BR 83 .L48 1996
George Eliot Middlemarch PR 4462 .A2 N4x 1926
Laurel Thatcher Ulrich Midwife’s Tale, A: The Life of Martha Ballard, Based on Her Diary, 1785-1812 F 29 .H15 U47 1990
Kate DiCamillo Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane, The 813 D547m
Brandon Sanderson Mistborn Popular Reading

Sa56we

Willa Cather My Antonia PS 3505 .A87 M8 1947
Elena Ferrante My Brilliant Friend (Italian: L’amica geniale) Online
Kamala Markandaya Nectar in a Sieve PR 6063 .A642 N43
Helen Mustard’s translation Nibelungenlied, The PN 6110 .E6 M4 1998
Lois Lowry Number the Stars 813 L955n
Homer Odyssey (Robert Fagles translation specifically) PA 4025 .A5 F34 2001
TH White Once and Future King 823 W585o
John Milton Paradise Lost PR 3560 .A2 K37 2005
Leif Enger Peace Like a River PS 3555 .N4223 P42 2001
Norton Juster Phantom Tollbooth, The 813 J982p 2005
Barbara Kingsolver Poisonwood Bible, The K617po
Jane Austen Pride and Prejudice PR 4034 .P7 1991
William Goldman Princess Bride, The Popular Reading – Fantasy G569p
Azar Nafisi Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books PE 64 .N34 A3 2003
Cameron Wright Rent Collector, The Popular Reading

W 93 re

Edmund Morris Rise of Theodore Roosevelt, The E 757 .M883 2001
Lloyd Douglas Robe, The PS 3507 .O7573 R62
E.M. Forster Room with a View, A PR 6011 .O58 R66x 1923
Eloise M. Boyle and Genevra Gerhart Russian Context, The: The culture behind the language P 35.5 .R9 R87 2002
Jack London Sea Wolf, The PS 3523 .O46 S42 1959
Carlos Ruiz Zafón Shadow of the Wind, The (Spanish: La sombra del viento) PQ 6668 .U49 S6613
Herman Hesse Siddhartha PT 2617 .E85 S5213 1951
George Eliot Silas Marner PR 4670 .A1 1993
Bess Streeter Aldrich Song of Years PS 3501 .L378 S65 1939
Helen Keller Story of My Life, The HV 1624 .K4 A15 1904
Charles Dickens Tale of Two Cities, A PR 4571 .A1 1993
Harper Lee To Kill a Mockingbird PS 3562 .E353 T6 2002
Betty Smith Tree Grows in Brooklyn, A PS 3537 .M2895 T7 2001
Sawako Ariyohi The Twilight Years PL 845 .R5 K613 1984
Bill Bryson Walk in the Woods, A: Rediscovering America on the Appalachian Trail Online only
Sharon Creech Walk Two Moons 813 C8617w
Richard Adams Watership Down PZ 4 .A64 W33 1996
Yevgeny Zamyatin We Popular Reading

Z 14 we

Terry Pratchett Wee Free Men, The Popular Reading

P887we

Just in Time for Halloween, an Exhibition Connecting Monsters and Candy

While the Library is only open to current BYU students and employees, we are happy to announce our new exhibition—Discovery & Wonder: The Harry F. Bruning Collection of Japanese Rare Books and Manuscripts.

This is one of the most interesting collections in the L. Tom Perry Special Collections.

Jack Stoneman, Associate Professor, Japanese Section Head, Asian & Near Eastern Languages, and Aaron Skabelund, Associate Professor in the Department of History, worked with Maggie Kopp, Curator of Rare Books, to tell the story of how the Bruning collection was built and how it came to BYU.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic we can’t invite the public to the exhibit at this time. That said, everyone can view one of the most interesting items in the exhibit online at https://bakemono.lib.byu.edu/. This site tells the story of our “monster scroll.”

If you are a current student on campus or a BYU employee, you can see the exhibition in person by visiting Special Collections on level 1 of the library. The Library, following university policy, requires you to wear a mask and practice social distancing.

When you visit, look for the candy connection to the exhibit materials and Japan.